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McGowanPhoto
McGowanPhoto - Photographer
Photographer
Arizona, United States
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Unfortunately, that "save for the web" is the RIGHT thing to do when an image is going to be viewed in a Web browser.

It shows you what you'll get with the narrow range of tones that Web browsers support.

No matter how much information you pump into a file, as soon as it's (a) compressed by MuseCube and (b) viewed in a browser window, the end viewer will see something very much like what you see in the "save for web" window.

The best idea is to do a "save for web," look at the results, and decide if that's what you want. If not, cancel, tweak your original and try again. Pretty soon, you'll figure out how to balance the process to get the most out of the conversion.

The main advantages to "save for web" are that it shrinks the file considerably AND gives you a preview of what it'll look like in a browser.



Posted at 08:19 PM on Feb 10, 2006

McGowanPhoto
McGowanPhoto - Photographer
Photographer
Arizona, United States
View Portfolio


What "save for web" does is to show you what others will see in their browsers. If that's "trashing the image," then that's what others will see of your photos.

That part of Photoshop does a number of things. It changes the dpi, it changes the contrast range, and it can adjust the amount of compression. If you don't like what you're getting, learn how to maximize the function. Lots of things are adjustable.

But ignoring it simply means you post big files on the Web. They take longer to download. AND they wind up looking the way you didn't want them to on other people's computers.

It's there for a reason. Learn to tame it, and you'll be happy with the way your pictures look in browsers. Oh, and the compression mechanisms like MuseCube and the other hosting sites won't create as much garbage when you post those images, either. Most of that comes from them applying compressions without regard to how the user wanted the image to look.



Posted at 08:24 PM on Feb 11, 2006

lengee
lengee - Photographer
Photographer
California, United States
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Geoff told me when I started here that the upload will resize/resample the photo if it's over 400 pixles wide. If you keep it under that, it should be fine.

Then look at the final size and see if it fits with your membership level for uploading. If it's less, re-adjust for less compression and until it just fits under the allowed size for the best quality.

Also make sure that your monitor is calibrated and view the photo with different monitors (bug friends) and see if it looks good on most of them - kinda average it out. Try different lighting conditions too.



Posted at 01:47 AM on Feb 12, 2006

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